Review: The Green Road, by Anne Enright

The Green Road by Anne Enright My rating: 4 of 5 stars The Green Road, by Anne Enright, is an introspective, remarkable, often poignant story about the four siblings of the Madigan family, and their mercurial, often tempestuous, aging mother, Rosaleen. Set primarily in Enright’s native country of Ireland, the narratives of the four children sometimes wander from that green island to America and Mali, carrying with them the subterranean influences of their mother’s influence….

Review: A Brightness Long Ago, by Guy Gavriel Kay

A Brightness Long Ago by Guy Gavriel Kay My rating: 3 of 5 stars It would be a stretch of the truth to say Guy Gavriel Kay is anything but an accomplished story-teller. He crafts his work with elegance, passion, and detail. You would think with that praise I would rate his work higher than I do, for certainly there is much here to engage the reader. However, having read almost all of Kay’s canon…

Review: In the Skin of a Lion, by Michael Ondaatje

In the Skin of a Lion by Michael Ondaatje My rating: 3 of 5 stars There is no disputing the literary skill of Michael Ondaatje. His works have been captivating readers for decades. However, it would be unreasonable for anyone to expect every work any artist creates to be extraordinary. And such is the case, in my opinion, with In the Skin of a Lion. It is an ambitious novel which encompasses the lives of…

Review: Five Little Indians, by Michelle Good

Five Little Indians by Michelle Good My rating: 3 of 5 stars It is important to begin this review with the fact I’m Caucasian, first generation Italian, third generation Irish, born in Canada, live a life which many would call privileged, but would do so without understanding of family background, struggle, trauma. I do understand being a victim. But I do not have an understanding of residential school trauma. Having said all that, I do…

Reviewed in Ottawa Review of Books

I am just thrilled to learn my recent novel, The Rose Guardian, has been reviewed by Robert Runté in The Ottawa Review of Books. How amazing is that? The full review is here: It starts with a funeral. Una Cotter is dead, and her sixty-something daughter, Vi, is left to sort out her feelings about her mother, her family, her childhood, and her ambiguous inheritance. One cannot but grieve the passing of one’s mother, but when Una…